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Holocaust survivors and others eliminated Poles (if they were any) from the Polish- Jewish dialogue, or “We” to” Us”

carlos benson|Tuesday, October 4, 2011

ACCORDING TO The Polish  President’s web site „ on 22 of September 2011 at General Consulate of Poland in New York  during the meeting with American Polonia the President of Polish Republic  rewarded  important  and high medals to  the citizens of United States of America and to Poles living in USA for success  attained in the Polish Jewish dialogue. Who are these medals recipients?


  Anthony Polonsky (born 1940 in Johannesburg, South Africa from Jewish parents emigrated from Lithuania) -Albert Abramson Professor of Holocaust Studies.  He studied history and political science at the University of the Witwatersrand.  Later, went to England on a Rhodes scholarship in 1961 and read modern history at Worcester College and St Antony’s College. In 1970, he was appointed lecturer in International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science and in 1989 was awarded the title of Professor. He has also been a visiting professor at the University of Warsaw, the Institute for the Human Sciences, Vienna and the University of Cape Town, Skirball visiting fellow at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Senior Associate Member of Saint Antony’s College, Oxford and Honorary Research Fellow at University College, London. Dr. Polonsky was a founder and is now vice-president of the Institute for Polish-Jewish Studies in Oxford and of the American Association for Polish-Jewish Studies, Cambridge, MA. He was for six years a member of the Board of Deputies of British Jews and was a member of its Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial Committee and Chairman of the Academic and Educational sub-committee of this Committee. He is an editor of The Library of Holocaust Testimonies. He is an honorary research fellow in the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at University College, London, a member of the International Advisory Board of the Mordekhai Anieliewicz Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Warsaw, of the Jewish University in Moscow, of the International Advisory Council of Sefer, the Center for University Teaching of Jewish Civilization in Moscow, of the Editorial Advisory Board of the Simon Dubnow Institute  In short, he is researcher of Semitic origin, as others from his milieu, he „specializes „in Polish -Jewish relations” and writing with deeper knowledge   about it, like Jan Thomasz Gross. . . Arthur Schneier-(born March20, 1930 in Vienna) Rabbi, who survived holocaust and is encouraging religious dialogue.            Pope Benedict XVI was his guest in the New York Synagogue. Rabbi Schneier is known also for his pioneering role in the struggle on behalf of Soviet Jewry and the rebuilding of Jewish religious life in Russia, the Ukraine and Eastern Europe, successfully negotiating the return of the Moscow Synagogue to the Jewish community. Starting with his first visit to Moscow in1966, he has intervened with Soviet and Eastern European governments to ease the plight of religious believers; headed interfaith missions to Europe, Central Asia, Middle East, and Latin America; convened six international conferences with government and religious leaders from the former Yugoslavia and Southeast Europe to halt ethnic conflict and further reconciliation. The Recipient of eleven honorary doctorates from U.S. and European universities. His alma mater, Yeshiva University, honored him by establishing the Rabbi Arthur Schneier Center for International Affairs. In 2010, Hofstra University bestowed the Guru Nanak Interfaith Prize which recognizes significant work to increase interfaith understanding. He is a member of Council on Foreign Relations; Asia Society; United Nations Development Corporation; United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Committee on Conscience; Conference of Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations; Joint Distribution Committee; Past President and Honorary Chairman, Religious Zionists of America, Honorary Chairman, World Jewish Congress American Section Rabbi Arthur Schneier was born in Vienna, Austria, March 20, 1930. Rabbi Schneier lived under Nazi occupation in Budapest during World War II and arrived in the United States in 1947.  SIMON BERGSON-reworded by Polish President Boronislaw Komorowski In the late 1970s Simon Bergson started his business as the owner-operator of a small beverage center in lower Manhattan, New York City. Over the past twenty-eight years, Manhattan Beer Distributors has strived to become the premier full-service beverage company in Metro New York. Our mission is to assist you in best serving your customers. We promise to provide you with a diverse portfolio of profitable products, sold by a highly trained sales staff, and delivered on demand by a dedicated delivery force. It is this commitment to customer service that has enabled us to remain one of the best-established and most respected distribution companies. In the late 1970s Simon Bergson started his business as the owner-operator of a small beverage center in lower Manhattan, New York City.
 Today, Manhattan Beer Distributors directly services over 25,000 accounts in the metro New York City area. We represent over 50 suppliers and offer some of the highest quality products in the world.        Dr. Julian Bussgang – born in Lwow, before World War II. He is an author of the book title:  "Polish Jew – Polish Soldier (1939-1945)" As a veteran of Poland's 2nd Corps who fought in the Italian campaign, including the Battle of Monte Cassino, during World War II. HE was one of a few Jews, who did not left, or desert the Polish Anders army during the stay in Palestine.  “Polish Jew – Polish Soldier” can `be a resource historical documents that confront the false stereotype of total passivity of Polish Jews in fighting against the Nazi oppressor. Later in 1947 Dr.Bussang http://washington.polemb.net/gallery/serwis/px.gif   Ruth Gruber-age of 100  During her long life, she was: Journalist, photographer, writer, humanitarian, U.S. government official. She was born to Russian Jewish emigrants in Brooklyn. She went to Germany in thirties and wrote about women under fascism and communism. She was first foreign correspondent to Siberia and Soviet Arctic. She was Assistant to the Secretary to the Interior during the World War II. She was in charge to rescue the Jews from Europe to USA. She accompanied the Jews in 1947 In Haifa, and later she accompanied to DP’s back to Germany. In 2008 she was honored for her work defending free expression. National Coalition against Censorship).    Luna Kaufman (also known as Luna Fuss) -Holocaust survivor of three concentration camps. Now a she travels to the schools and universities talking about beating up Jewish People in Krakow as well as “there was no justice” for Jews in Poland - according to her words, but “we depended on the kindness of people”.  After the War, she returned to Krakow and completed her education at Jagellonian University and the Music Conservatory .Later in 1950 she immigrated to Israel and in 1951 she came to USA Seton Hall University proudly awarded Luna Kaufman the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa, on May 11, 2009 and lately she received the medal from President of Poland Bronislaw Komorowski on Sept. 22 20111. For successes in the Polish – Jewish dialogue. She wrote her memoirs “Luna’s Life” and received the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa, on May 11, 2009  Masha Leon- columnist   Columnist Masha Leon, who has covered social events for the Forverts and then the Forward for more than 30 years, was honored Thursday night by the government of Poland for her articles and other work that have helped further the understanding of Polish-Jewish lives, history and culture. Leon, who is normally talkative, was at a loss for words to describe how she felt about receiving the prestigious award. “It’s beyond description,” she said. “It’s really a validation by the government of the role Jews historically played in Poland.” Noting “the Polish heart is so big” the president said that each of the honorees had a story to tell about what he or she had overcome. “Behind every person is a very difficult history,” he said, adding that for some it was “a very difficult Jewish history. Thank you for everything you have done.” The Polish consul general told Leon about six months ago that she was being considered for the award. The columnist submitted 25 to 30 articles from the Forward, and promptly forgot about it until the consul general called to tell her recently that she would be recognized. Noting “the Polish heart is so big” the president said that each of the honorees had a story to tell about what he or she had overcome. “Behind every person is a very difficult history,” he said, adding that for some it was “a very difficult Jewish history. Thank you for everything you have done.” For Leon, on the night that she shook hands with the Polish president and was warmly greeted by Consul General Ewa Junczyk-Ziomecka, the memories of her girlhood days on the streets of Warsaw, where she was called names and stones were thrown at her simply because she is a Jew, came flowing back easily. In an interview, Leon, nee Masha Bernstein, recounted how during World War II she and her mother, Zelda Bernstein, were hidden by a Catholic woman, until they could escape from German-occupied Poland to Russian-occupied Poland. Her father, Matvey Bernstein, a Polish journalist, was imprisoned for his anti-Communist sympathies. For Leon and her mother, the odyssey took them to Lithuania for a year, to Japan, and eventually to the United States. Leon began writing for an English insert in the Forverts in about 1980. Then her coverage of Jewish galas, dinners, awards ceremonies and other events migrated into the Forward, where she writes a weekly newspaper column called “On the Go” with an expanded version of the column online. She has also written about the Holocaust, arts and culture, moderated panels and been involved in other ways in furthering Polish-Jewish dialogue. ( http://blogs.forward.com/the-shmooze/143418/#ixzz1ZmUutRbx)   For Leon, on the night that she shook hands with the Polish president and was warmly greeted by Consul General Ewa Junczyk-Ziomecka, the memories of her girlhood days on the streets of Warsaw, where she was called names and stones were thrown at her simply because she is a Jew, came flowing back easily. In an interview, Leon, nee Masha Bernstein, recounted how during World War II she and her mother, Zelda Bernstein, were hidden by a Catholic woman, until they could escape from German-occupied Poland to Russian-occupied Poland. Her father, Matvey Bernstein, a Polish journalist, was imprisoned for his anti-Communist sympathies. For Leon and her mother, the odyssey took them to Lithuania for a year, to Japan, and eventually to the United States. Leon began writing for an English insert in the Forverts in about 1980. Then her coverage of Jewish galas, dinners, awards ceremonies and other events migrated into the Forward, where she writes a weekly newspaper column called “On the Go” with an expanded version of the column online. She has also written about the Holocaust, arts and culture, moderated panels and been involved in other ways in furthering Polish-Jewish dialogue. For Leon, on the night that she shook hands with the Polish president and was warmly greeted by Consul General Ewa Junczyk-Ziomecka, the memories of her girlhood days on the streets of Warsaw, where she was called names and stones were thrown at her simply because she is a Jew, came flowing back easily. In an interview, Leon, nee Masha Bernstein, recounted how during World War II she and her mother, Zelda Bernstein, were hidden by a Catholic woman, until they could escape from German-occupied Poland to Russian-occupied Poland. Her father, Matvey Bernstein, a Polish journalist, was imprisoned for his anti-Communist sympathies. For Leon and her mother, the odyssey took them to Lithuania for a year, to Japan, and eventually to the United States. Leon began writing for an English insert in the Forverts in about 1980. Then her coverage of Jewish galas, dinners, awards ceremonies and other events migrated into the Forward, where she writes a weekly newspaper column called “On the Go” with an expanded version of the column online. She has also written about the Holocaust, arts and culture, moderated panels and been involved in other ways in furthering Polish-Jewish dialogue. David Marwell    He is an American historian and the current director of the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City.   Prior to his work at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. from 1997 to 2000, Marwell was director of the Berlin Document Center from 1988 to 1994[ and then executive director of the JFK Assassination Records Review Board. He also served as Chief of Investigative Research for the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Special Investigations. In that capacity, Marwell was responsible for conducting historical and forensic research in support of Justice Department prosecution of Nazi war criminals, including Klaus Barbie and Josef Mengele. He has also served as an expert witness and consultant to the governments of Canada and Australia on several war crime prosecutions, and was a member of the Interagency Working Group for Nazi War Criminal Documents.
David marwell is part of the Auschwitz Jewish Center Foundation, an organization which has its main offices in New York, NY. David serves as the President at Auschwitz Jewish Center    Recently  all of them were  rewarded by Polish President Bronislaw Komorowski for their apparent efforts in the Polish – Jewish Dialogue. is this "We' to "You" real , or only apperent?
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