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Thore who risked their lives,Jews of Bialystok,Phirte of Eagles,year 1919-20, batle of warsaw

Sunday, May 23, 2010
               
        The Yad Vashem list, containing personal names, locality information, and short-paragraph descriptions of each of the 5,400 honored Poles, is valid as of the end of 2003. However, the limitations of the Yad Vashem system should be remembered. First of all, numerous Polish rescuers were never honored by Yad Vashem because the ungrateful rescued Jews refused to identify or confirm the names of their Polish rescuers. Second, Yad Vashem refuses to honor the many Poles who were murdered by the Germans in reprisal for aid to Jews. In still other cases, both the hidden Jews and Polish benefactors were murdere                                             >>more...

The Triumph of Provocation

Friday, April 9, 2010
This work provides countless historical details, a few of which I mention. King Stanislaw August is described as excessively conciliatory to Russia, but not someone who was a puppet of Catherine the Great. (pp. 40-41).

Polonophobes and Communist apologists still try to blame the Poles for starting the 1920 Polish-Soviet War. Mackiewicz, a participant in this war, knows better. He notes the seamless flow of conflict going back to the battles of WWI: "It [the 1920 War] was caused in the first place by the Germans' withdrawal from the intervening zone of occupation, the Ober-Ost, in February 1919, and continued without a break until 12 October 1920. The Soviet War grew out of the first unplanned skirmish, which occurred at Bereza Kartuska in Byelorussia on 14 February 1919." (p. 218). >>more...

The Cigarette Sellers of Three Crosses Square (The Library of Holocaust Testimonies)

Friday, April 9, 2010
Instead of repeating other reviewers, I focus mainly on barely-mentioned and unmentioned content. The story of the Jewish boys who sold cigarettes in the Polish side of Warsaw is a moving one. The Jewish boys met Polish boys who bullied them, and other Polish boys who protected them. (p. 116). The Jewish boys obtained fake identification (pp. 125-126), probably from the Zegota, a one-of-a-kind Polish organization of aid to Jews (unmatched anywhere in all of German-occupied Europe. >>more...

The eighteenth decisive battle of the world: Warsaw, 1920 (Russian studies)

Friday, April 9, 2010
he 1920 War was not the first time that Poland had saved Europe. D'Abernon comments: "In 1684 the Ottoman invasion made its furthest advance west. The Battle of Vienna was one of the occasions when Europe owed safety to Polish valour. Already at Chocim in 1280 Polish arms attained an important victory over Asiatic assailants, but the danger was even more grave before the walls of Vienna, and John Sobieski earned the gratitude of all who value the maintenance of European civilisation." (p. 11). >>more...

POPULATION TRANSFERS, EXPULSIONS, AND ESCAPES, 1939-1959

Friday, April 9, 2010
POPULATION TRANSFERS, EXPULSIONS, AND ESCAPES, 1939-1959 is the title of this Polish-language annotated encyclopedic atlas. Every imaginable form of population relocation that took place during the relevant period is covered, and described with statistics and maps. Poles, Germans, Jews, Ukrainians, and other groups are considered. In my review, I emphasize the Poles. >>more...

Pavement of Hell: Three Leaders of the Judenrat

Wednesday, March 31, 2010
This three-part book focuses on the lives of Chaim Rumkowski (Rumkovsky) of the Lodz (Litzmannstadt) Ghetto, Adam Czerniakow of the Warsaw Ghetto, and Jacob Gens of the Vilna (Wilno, Vilnius) Ghetto. Tushnet consistently brings up examples of behaviors in these men that were variously harmful and at other times helpful towards fellow Jews facing the unfolding Holocaust. He also cites a selection of Jewish opinions on the character of these Judenrat leaders >>more...

The Case of Hotel Polski

Thursday, March 25, 2010
After the fall of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising and the destruction of the Warsaw Ghetto, there were still some 10,000--30,000 Warsaw Jews still alive, but now hiding among Poles in the Aryan section of the city. (p. 10). The Hotel Polski in Warsaw became a focus of promises, by Nazis and their Jewish collaborators, for fugitive Jews to come out of hiding so that they could be amnestied by being declared foreign citizens. (pp. 12-13, 111). >>more...

Liliana's journal: Warsaw 1939-1945

Thursday, March 25, 2010
In common with countless Jewish and Polish eyewitnesses, the author describes the indiscriminate bombing and strafing of defenseless Polish civilians, by the Luftwaffe, during the German-Soviet conquest of Poland in 1939. (p. 11). She recognizes the fact that the Volksdeutschen were Poles of German descent. (p. 18). >>more...

Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, and Rare Jewish Acknowledgement of the Communist GL-AL Killing Fugitive Jews,

Thursday, March 25, 2010
While describing the events that led up to and included the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising (1943), the author frequently mentions the many forms of Polish aid to Jews. (p. 19, 21, 45, 59, 68, 80, 88, 95, 98, 136). This included help from members of the Policja Granatowa (Polish Blue Police)(p. 63, 71), which has at times been misrepresented as a mostly collaborationist force. >>more...

Between tumbling walls

Saturday, March 20, 2010
This book is unusual in several respects. It contains a diary of life in Warsaw--not in the Warsaw Ghetto before the Jewish Uprising, but covert life in Aryan Warsaw after this Uprising. (pp. 115-157). >>more...
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